Together, our gardens are a vast living landscape. With an estimated 16 million gardens in the UK, the way they are cared for can make a big difference to the natural world.

Making space for nature in your garden

Go wild in your garden! Large or small, ledge or yard, your garden can be a mosaic in a wider network of natural havens linking urban green spaces with nature reserves and the countryside.

Hedgehogs, sparrows, song thrushes and stag beetles are all declining species in the UK, but if we manage our gardens to benefit wildlife, these creatures and many more will find refuge. It’s not hard to be of help. Consider a whole host of wild ideas and features – or just pick one and then sit back, enjoy the view and see who visits!

Why have a plain, ugly fence when a green, living boundary can bring the riches of flowers, scent, berries, rich autumn colours and wildlife? Ever thought about which heavenly-scented plants provide night-time nectar for moths? Or digging a pond? If you introduce a water feature, not for fish but for newts, dragonflies, pond skaters, you'll also be providing water for birds. Plant up the edges with the golden blooms of marsh marigolds and the lush spikes of purple loosestrife and you'll have nectar stations for insects and beauty to dwell on.

Be inspired by our 'How to get started' information and factsheets below – they cover everything from creating a miniature meadow and creature features, to making birdboxes and butterfly gardening. 

'How to get started' factsheets

Click on the images below to download the corresponding factsheet (PDF format):

Feeding garden birds

How to attract birds to your garden and help them to thrive.

Image: Derek Moore. Click here to download the factsheet

 

Butterfly gardening

Hints and tips for attracting butterflies to the garden.

Click here to download the factsheet

Garden bumblebees

Attracting bumblebees and making artificial nest sites for them.

Click here to download the factsheet

Furry furniture

Give mammals a helping hand in our concrete world!

Click here to download the factsheet

 

Creature features

Help animals to survive the winter in your garden!

Click here to download the factsheet

Cunning containers

Wildlife-friendly hanging baskets, planters and window boxes.

Click here to download the factsheet

Trees and shade plants

How to plant a wildlife-rich shady area in your garden.

Click here to download the factsheet

 

Wildflower meadows

Wildflowers can be grown at home, even by those without a lawn!

Click here to download the factsheet

Hedges for wildlife

Why have a plain fence, when you could have a living boundary?!

Click here to download the factsheet

Organic gardening

The most natural way of gardening - find out more!

Click here to download the factsheet

 

Making compost

Making your own garden compost is great fun and easy to do!

Image: Diego Grez (Wikimedia). Click here to download the factsheet

Wildlife pond pack

How to design, build and maintain a garden wildlife pond.

Click here to download the factsheet

Pest or guest, friend or foe?

Is there really such a thing as a garden pest? Find out more...

Click here to download the factsheet

 

Snail and slug control

Read up on wildlife-friendly control methods for snails & slugs.

Click here to download the factsheet

Basically boxes - birds

Making and installing nest boxes for birds in the garden.

Image: Amy Lewis. Click here to download the factsheet

 

Basically boxes - bats 

Making and installing bat boxes in the garden.

Image: Amy Lewis. Click here to download the factsheet

   

Obtaining Supplies

Vine House Farm bird food

If you feed birds in your garden, check out the fantastic range of Vine House Farm bird food by clicking their logo below. Herefordshire Wildlife Trust receives 4.5% of every order placed by people who live in our postcode area, so place an order today!

Vine House Farm

Queenswood Shop

Herefordshire Wildlife Trust's shop at Queenswood Country Park stocks a wide range of fantastic products, some of which will help with making your garden more wildlife-friendly. Click the image below to find out more:

Image: Paul Cooper